AirAsia resumes Bali and Lombok flights

AirAsia has resumed flights to and from Bali and Lombok, with flying conditions around the Gusti Ngurah Rai International Airport and Lombok International Airport expected to remain clear.

AirAsia, in a statement today, said it would continue to monitor the situation closely and keep guests informed of any development.

The Malaysian-based low-cost airline also advised passengers to check the status of their flight on Twitter (@AirAsia) or airasia.com before heading to the airport.

It said those flying to Bali or Lombok from now until Dec 31, who no longer wished to travel, would be entitled to choose one of the service recovery options.

“For flights from Nov 25 until Dec 10, guests can pick to move flight and change to a new travel date on the same route within 30 calendar days from the original flight date without additional cost and subject to seat availability.”

“They can also retain the value of fare in their AirAsia BIG Loyalty account for future travel with the airline or obtain full refund in the amount equivalent to their booking, via the e-form available on support.airasia.com,” it said.

Meanwhile, for flights from Dec 11 until Dec 31, passengers can choose either to change flights to a new travel date on the same route up to Jan 31, 2018 without additional cost and subject to seat availability or reroute to another destination within the AirAsia network with fare difference applicable, subject to seat availability.

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“Or guests can retain the value of fare in AirAsia BIG Loyalty account for future travel with AirAsia,” it added.

The airport reopened on Wednesday last week, two days after volcanic ash spewing from Mount Agung spread across the island and forced it to close. Malaysia Airlines (MAS) and Malindo Air resumed their flights to the island last week, following the reopening of the airport.

Most airlines, however, only resumed their flights to the popular holiday destination this week.

More than 120,000 tourists were stranded in Bali, including 1,000 Malaysian tourists during the closure of the airport.

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